Polarised Sunglasses

Driving to work today, all I could see was the low winter sun beaming into my eyes. This inevitably caused me to slow down, bring the visor down, and also to get my sunglasses on. Sunglasses, in the winter of all time! Luckily I use polarised sunglasses.

A polarised lens greatly reduces reflected glare from water or from other surfaces. The sun’s rays reflect light in every direction, so when a ray hits a flat surface, the reflected light shines back at your eye and is magnified, causing glare. The technology within a polarised lenses blocks out horizontal light waves, allowing the vertical light waves to reach the eye. The person looking through the lens can still see clearly through the lens, with reduced brightness and glare of light, maximising comfort and visibility for the user.

So who could benefit from this you ask?

  • Drivers
  • Light sensitive individuals, including post cataract surgery patients
  • Individuals who are continually exposed to bright light through windows
  • Joggers
  • Bikers
  • Individuals involved in fishing

Reduces reflections from the water surface, ie when fishing the individual can see the fish in the water.

  • Individuals involved in water sports.

Basically, anyone who gets glare doing outdoor activities who has to deal with light coming from unwanted directions. The benefits of having polarised lenses are:

  • Colour perception.

Colours appear bolder and brighter

  • Enhanced clarity.

Better contrast, reduced glare and less stress on the eyes results in an overall better clarity of vision.

  • Better contrast

Because glare is blocked, contrast is enhanced vision, which results in better safety for outdoor activities.

  • Reduced eye stress.

Since the harmful light rays are blocked and what you see is enhanced, your eyes won’t have to work as hard.

Of course, the other option is to have tinted lenses. They’re not bad either, they’re good for reducing brightness and blocking UV, but they don’t eliminate harsh glare in the way that polarised lenses do

So who do we not recommend polarised lenses for?

  • Pilots, the polarised lenses may interfere with the various screens which a pilot uses within the aircraft. Can also make other airplanes less visible.
  • Skiers who ski down steep slopes, the polarised lenses will reduce the visibility of potentially harmful ice patches on the slope.

Now to park up, have a lovely coffee, and start my day in an artificially lit room, away from the winter’s light.

sunglasses scotstoun

 

 

Anti Glare Lens

So now the fireworks show is over, we are fast getting ready for Christmas. As a season of change, we’ve just seen the first falling of snow, which inevitably means a rush to get the scrappers for the cars, and that extra jacket just in case. When it comes to driving, the smallest things can prove the most important. Scrapping the windows of ice would seem sensible, but when were the wipers last changed? As the smeared the windscreen, I realized mine hadn’t been changed for a very long time. The next thing to ask, are you wearing the latest glasses? And are they fitted with an anti-glare coating?

An anti-glare coated lens is what it says on the tin; it cuts out glare that a traditional lens would cause. A standard lens reflects between 5-8% of light, whereas an anti-glare coated lens reflects less than 1%. Now picture that snowy night as you drive home, what would you rather have?

At Eyes Optical, we offer the anti-glare upgrade for as little as £10 extra, well worth it if you ask us.

Picture the same scenario when you’re watching TV. The best movie ever is being shown (or streamed, or downloaded, so much choice these days!) You have an HD TV, beautiful, crisp clarity, what kind of glasses do you want to enjoy the movie with? It’s a no-brainer, why have a fantastic TV, only to be let down by the lenses you use to watch it with?

anti glare glasses